Silver Reales Cob

SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS

SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS
SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS
SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS
SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS
SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS

SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS
This is an important specimen of cob coinage from Spain. This Madrid Mint cob is one of ONLY TWO PIECES KNOWN to PCGS and it's a beauty! Grade cabinet toning attest to its originality and makes for a highly attractive coin. The date is rare and the type is also rare. Cob coinage from Spain in the 17th century refers to a distinctive type of coin that was produced during this period. The term "cob" is derived from the Spanish word "cabo, " meaning "end" or "cut, " and it describes coins that were crudely shaped and produced by cutting irregular pieces from hammered metal rods. These coins were then stamped with designs and inscriptions. Here are some key features of cob coinage from Spain in the 17th century. Cobs were typically irregularly shaped due to the cutting process. They lacked the precision of later minting methods.

Cobs were part of the hammered coinage tradition, where metal blanks were struck with dies using a hammer and anvil. The most common denomination for cob coinage was the Spanish silver real. Multiple denominations were produced, ranging from 1/2, 1, 2, 4, and 8 Reales.

Cobs were produced at various Spanish and colonial mints, including those in Mexico, Peru, Colombia, and other regions. The most famous of these mints was probably the Mexico City Mint (Casa de Moneda de México).

Cobs typically featured the Spanish coat of arms, the Habsburg shield, and other colonial symbols. However, the designs were often crude, and the quality varied. Spanish silver cobs were widely used in international trade during the Age of Exploration and the colonial period. They were recognized and accepted as a form of currency in many parts of the world.

Cobs are often associated with pirate lore and shipwrecks. Many Spanish galleons carrying cobs as cargo sank in the waters of the Caribbean, leading to the discovery of cob coin hoards by modern treasure hunters.
SPAIN 1644-MD IB 8 Reales Cob MADRID MINT PCGS VF35 ONLY TWO KNOWN TO PCGS